Isabel Fuente and Jim Lloyd invite you to join them for the

FIESTA DE LA VIRGEN DE LA CANDELARIA

February 2, 2005

 

          

 

Cost: $690 pesos per person

Included: Bus transportation, guided tour and comida

Time: Leave Lloyds parking lot at 9:30 AM, return around 6:00 PM

Payment: ˝ payment at the time of reservation and payment by January 26 (non refundable after this date.)

 

This one day tour takes us to Tuxpan, a town continually rebuilt after numerous earthquakes, located near Ciudad Guzman.  Although their buildings have fallen, their traditions remain intact.  One of these traditions is the February 2nd Fiesta de la Virgen de la Candelaria, also know as Candlemas.

 

This regional fiesta is famous for two kinds of dances: the Chayacates (left picture above) and Sonajeros (right above) dances. 

 

Around 1774 a plague of chickenpox hit Tuxpan and the surrounding area.  The people prayed to St. Sebastian, patron of health, to be delivered from this epidemic.  To be grateful for the miracle of healing the indigenous organized the dance of the Chayacates to honor the martyred saint.  Chayacates comes from the Nahuatl Chayácatl and means “man with a mask..”   The oldest and most famous of the two dances is the Sonajeros.  Its origin is prehispanic and is known as the dance of the warriors.  The dancers danced to the sound of a drum made from the skin of a deer and a flute of carrizo.

 

The dancers will arrive in the courtyard of the church coming from the various barrios of Tuxpan.  When all have arrived each group will dance into the church, pay homage to the Christ child and come out of the church dancing.  It is a mixture of Christian and prehispanic rites.

 

During the Fiesta artisans will have craft items for display and sale.  For comida, around 3:00 PM, we will have Cuachala, a traditional dish of the area served during festivities.  We will have more written information for you about the fiesta on the day of the tour.

 

For more pictures of  Fiesta 2005, check out http://jim2rob.com/cooktux05.html

 

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